Descendants of John Howell through his son,
John, Jr. of North Carolina and Tennessee

FIRST GENERATION

1. John Howell, Sr. was born 1732 in Chester County, Pennsylvania and died about 1774 in Orange County, North Carolina.  He married Ann Mechem on 20 March 1750/1 in Chester County, Pennsylvania.  She was born about 1730 in Goshen Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. 

Around 1760-1761 John Howell and (Ann) Mechem moved to Orange County, North Carolina. John Howell, Sr.'s estate inventory, dated 1774, shows his son, John Howell, Jr. as the administrator.   John, Sr. lived on the Haw River at Back Creek in present-day Alamance County, then Orange.  A reference in the court records speaks of a Howell's Ferry on the Haw River and it's likely that it was John, Sr's. ferry.

Ann (Mechem) Howell appears in the Quaker Records of the Cane Creek Monthly Meeting by December 1774 as having remarried a Mr. Farmer and was "disowned."

Children of John Howell and Ann Mechem:

  2. i. John Howell, Jr., born about 1753; died 1808.
    ii. Thomas Howell, born circa 1757 in North Carolina.  Married Miss _?_ Bearfield (Barfield? Berfield?).  Resided in South Carolina. 
  3. iii. Francis Howell, born 27 September 1762; died 27 October 1834.


SECOND GENERATION

2.  John Howell, Jr., was born about 1753 in North Carolina.  He died in 1808 in Rutherford County, Tennessee.  In 1774, John Howell, Jr. appears in the administration of his father's estate.  He was only about 21 at the time, with two younger brothers ~ Thomas, about 17 at the time and Francis, 12.  On June 17, 1777, John enlisted as a private in the North Carolina Forces, 2nd regiment commanded by Hale, and served in the American Revolution for three years. (SAR National #170441)   On 22 March 1784 land grant (#4808)  was issued to John Howell for service performed by Rich Johnston.  By the late 1790's, John was the owner of about 2,000 acres of land, in both North Carolina and middle Tennessee.  Records of 1779 show John, Jr. was a surveyor. John, Jr. and his brother, Francis, owned land on Stony Creek in Orange County (now Alamance).   Among their neighbors was Mordecai Gwin who had a daughter, Sarah, born about 1750. It is likely that she was John's wife.  John then moved to Rockingham County, North Carolina. He appears to have lived on both Jacob's Creek and Troublesome Creek. John and Francis built a gristmill on Troublesome Creek.   John, wife Sarah, and children migrated to Stewart's Creek, Rutherford County, Tennessee about 1796.   John operated Howell's Mill and was one of the County's first Commissioners, a County Cotton Inspector, a County Ranger, and a Justice of the Peace.  In the records between 1803-1808, he is referred to as Captain, Esquire, and Gentleman.  He is listed in the Tax Records of 1804 for Rutherford County.  Lands reported for double tax in 1804: Wm. Gwin, 640 acres, adj. to J. Howell (brother in law?).

Children of John Howell, Jr. and Sarah (Gwin?):

    i. Nancy Howell, born between 1770 and 1780; died between 1820 & 1832.  Married Thomas Nelson, who married (2) Judith Edwards.
    ii. Elizabeth Howell, born about 1772.  Married 4 Sept 1796 in Davidson County, Tennessee, Samuel McBride.
    iii. Margaret "Peggy" Howell, born 22 November 1778; died 3 March 1840 in Newbern, Alabama.  Married 12 April 1797 in Tennessee, James Whitsitt,   Margaret moved with her husband and children to Alabama about 1817.
    iv. William Howell, born between 1784 and 1789; died between 1813 & 1814 in Rutherford County, Tennessee.  Married Mary "Polly" _?_.  Ran Howell's Mill after his father's death and took over the County Ranger job.
    v. Gwin Howell, born between 1784 and 1794; died 1815 in Rutherford County, Tennessee.  Married 1810-1812, Catherine M. Edwards.

3.  Francis Howell was born 27 September 1762 in Orange County, North Carolina; died 27 October 1834 in Howell's Prairie, St. Charles County, Missouri in his 73rd year.  He married Susannah Stone, daughter of Benjamin Stone of South Carolina.  Susannah was born 11 December 1763 in Orange County, North Carolina and died 27 May 1826 in Howell's Prairie, St. Charles County, Missouri.  They removed to Missouri in 1797.  Francis first settled thirty miles west of St. Louis, in what is now St. Louis County, where he lived three years, then removed to what is now St. Charles County and settled on what has since been known as Howell's Prairie.  Soon after his settlement there he built a mill, called a "band mill," because it was run by a long band.  This was doubtless the first mill erected north of the Missouri River, except perhaps a small one at St. Charles.  Some time afterward, Mr. Howell built another mill on his farm, a cog mill, run by a large cog wheel.  His place was a noted resort during early times.  Musters and drills were frequently held there, and Indian agents in conducting Indians to and from St. Louis, often stopped there for supplies. 

Children of Francis Howell and Susannah Stone:

    i. John Howell.  Born 9 September 1781 in Orange County, North Carolina; died 25 Feb 1869 at age 87 in Howell's Prairie, St. Charles County, Missouri; buried in the Old Dardenne Cemetery, St. Charles County, Missouri.  Married three times, leaving 9 children: (1) Grace Baldridge on 21 Feb 1805 in St. Charles County, Missouri, 6 children; (2) Sarah R. Keele on 2 December 1819 in Howell's Prairie, St. Charles, County, Missouri, 3 children; (3) Joanna Evans on 10 April 1828 in St. Charles County, Missouri.   John was a Private Captain James Callaway's company of rangers.  Note: Both the 1850 (frame #1183) and 1860 (frame #1541) censuses of St. Charles say that John was born in Virginia.
  4. ii. Thomas Howell, born 14 March 1783 in North Carolina; died 12 September 1869.
    iii. Nancy Howell, born 27 January 1788; died 10 February 1864.  Married (1) Captain James Callaway; (2) John H. Castlio.
    iv. Newton Howell, born 28 January 1790 in Newbury County, South Carolina; died at the age of 74 on 20 January 1864 in Warren County, Missouri; buried in the Francis Howell Cemetery, near Weldon Springs, St. Charles County, Missouri.  He married (1) widow Rachel (Zumwalt) Long on 1 September 1811 in St. Charles, Missouri and by her had 10 children.  Newton married (2) Adelia A. Farris on 12 May 1860 in Warren County, Missouri (Warren County Court Records: Missouri Marriage Index, 1851-1900, microfilm #0967394-0967395).  Newton was a private in the company of dragoons who accompanied General Clark up the Missouri River to Fort Osage, at that time the westernmost fort and trading post in the U.S. Territory.  He was one of the earliest settlers of Warren County, Missouri, having settled about three and one half miles northeast of Warrenton, about 1814.  His will, dated 11 December 1862, is recorded in Warren County and mentions his wife Adelia and the following children: James L., Francis B., Serena A. Graves, William N., and the heirs of Benjamin F. deceased. (Some Boone Descendants and Kindred of the St. Charles District, by Lillian Hays Oliver, page 361.
    v. Francis Howell, Jr., born 23 November 1792; died 23 May 1874, at the age of 82.  He served two years in the company of rangers raised by his brother-in-law, Capt. James Callaway, and was Colonel of a regiment of St. Charles militia for five years.  Francis married widow Mary "Aunt Polly" (Meek) Ramsey, the daughter of James and Martha Meek.  She was still living at the age of 87.  They had no children of their own, but adopted a nephew, William Jackson Howell, when his mother died. William died on his way home from the California gold fields and was buried in the Pacific Ocean.
In his will Francis Howell provided for an endowment fund for the establishment of a seminary "in or near Mechanicsville". After Aunt Polly's death in 1881, Howell Institute was built, providing higher education not only for the young men and women of Mechanicsville and Howell's Prairie but also for students from St. Charles County and adjoining counties. The need for an accredited high school on Howell's Prairie resulted in the conversion, in 1915, of Howell Institute, with its endowment funds from Francis Howell, Jr., and his nephew, Hiram Beverly Castlio, in Francis Howell High School.

WILL OF FRANCIS HOWELL, JR.
Probate Court Vault, St. Charles, Missouri, volume 4, page 36
In the name of God Amen - I, Francis Howell of the County of St. Charles and state of Missouri, being old and frail but of sound and disposing mind and memory and being desirous of arranging and disposing of my real and personal estate agreeably to my views and wishes, do make this my last will and testament as follows. In the first place it is my will and wish that all of my just debts and funeral expenses be paid.
Secondly, I will and bequeath unto my beloved wife Mary Howell all of my household and kitchen furniture together with my residence, lots and other buildings at Mechanicsville, and also what money may be on hand at my decease as well as all of the money that may be owing to me (should she outlive me) during her natural life and after her death the said legacies shall be disposed of as hereafter directed.
Thirdly, I will and bequeath unto my niece Eliza A. Howell, the daughter of Thomas Howell, the before mentioned residence, lots and other buildings at Mechanicsville, upon which and in which I am now living, provided she will live with me so long as both I and my wife shall live and do for us as she has been heretofore doing, when upon the death of both of us said legacy shall be her absolute property, otherwise it shall revert to my estate and be disposed of as hereafter directed.
Fourthly, I will and bequeath unto my brother Lewis Howell an undivided interest which I have in the south fractional half of the NE quarter of Section 11 T 45 R 2 E containing seventy-nine acres and 60/100 of an acre, for the half of which I now hold Lewis Howell's bond for a deed.
Fifthly, I will and bequeath unto my niece Sarah R. Howell, the daughter of Lewis Howell, 200 acres off the east part of my farm including my residence and other building there, the same being bounded South by land belonging to the heirs of John Stewart Decease, east and north by land belonging to Joseph R. Dunlap, Zerelda Bishop heirs, James F. Stewart, John Blize, and probably by F. H. Stewart and also east and south by land belonging to John C. Castlio and to run west until the 200 acres be obtained.
Sixthly, It is my wish and will that the balance of my farm tract of land upward of 200 acres more or less be sold either all together or in parcels as may be agreed upon and thought best by Amazon Howell, Hiram B. Castlio, and Lewis M. Howell or their agents and the proceeds after all necessary expenses shall be paid to be divided into four equal parts and distributed as follows: One of said parts to be given to James William Howell, one part to be given to Emmett McDonald Castlio, the son of Hiram B. Castlio, and one part to be given to Stonewall Jackson Howell, the son of Amazon Howell, the said legacies to be managed by the parents or guardians of those children for their sole benefit
Seventhly, I will and bequeath to my niece Achillia A. Howell, the daughter of Lewis Howell, my residence in St. Charles together with the lot and the other buildings attached to the same.
Eightly, I give $25.00 to be paid unto the hands of him or them who may be appointed for the purpose of erecting a good enclosure around the graveyard where my father and mother lie.
Ninthly, It is my wish and will after the death of my wife that what personal property may be on hand be sold and the money arriving from the sale of such property and what money may be on hand, together with all outstanding debts, be collected and the same to constitute a fund for building a seminary at or near Mechanicsville, the cost of which not to exceed $3000.00 and the balance of said fund to be put and kept at interest well secured and the interest only to be used in paying or assisting to pay a teacher employed to teach in said seminary. And should Eliza A. Howell, before named, not accept of my proposition, the said residence and lots and buildings attached to the same, I wish to be disposed of to the best advantage, after the death of my said wife, and be added to the fund for the support of said teacher. I here state that I feel no ill will toward my other relatives but I consider it would be of very little benefit to divide my estate among so many. I have reason for doing as I have done.
Tenthly and lastly, I hereby appoint my nephew, Hiram B. Castlio, my sole Executor to see that this my last will and testament be executed revoking all former wills by me made. I further appoint the aid Hiram B. Castlio, Jasper N. Castlio, and Lewis Howell to attend to the seminary matter.
In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 13th day of September 1871.
Francis Howell
Witnesses
A. R. Swartzcope
D. Sheehan

A CODICIL TO THE WILL OF FRANCIS HOWELL
I hereby expressly confirm my former will dated Sept. 13, 1871, excepting so far as the disposition of my property is changed by this codicil.
In the first place whereas I willed in my last will one fourth part of the western half of my farm being upward of 200 acres be the same more or less to Gordon Wallace Howell, son of Lewis M. Howell, who that is the said Gordon Wallace has since died, now the fourth part of said land that the said Gordon Wallace Howell was to have, I will and bequeath unto James William Howell, the son of my brother Lewis Howell. In the second place whereas Eliza A. Howell chose not to live with me and my wife until our death, now the said residence and premise I wish to fall back to my estate and to be managed by those whom I have nominated in my will to manage the said seminary, to the best advantage, either for a seminary building or to be rented or sold for the purpose of erecting one, or the interest to assist in supporting teachers.
In the third place it is my wish and will that two of the trustees of said seminary shall always be blood relatives and should either of these three now appointed to manage the matter die, I hereby appoint Joseph R. Dunlap to take his place and after that whenever one shall die or resign or leave, the other two shall have the power to appoint his successor taking care however to have two of my blood relatives on the board.
In the fourth place I grant unto my beloved wife, Mary Howell, the privilege and wish her to exercise the same, to dispose of our household and kitchen as she wishes.
    vi. Benjamin Howell, born 20 September 1794; died 2 June 1858, at the age of 63.  He was Captain of a company of rangers for two years.  Benjamin married Mahala Castlio and by her, had 12 children.
    vii. Susannah L. Howell, 22 April 1798; died 23 February 1831, at the age of 33.  She married Larkin S. Callaway, son of Flanders Callaway.  Susan left 7 children.
    viii. Lewis Howell, born 22 May 1800; died 18 December 1876.  At the age of 34, married Serena Lamme in June 1833, daughter of William T. and Frances Lamme.  Their marriage was the first one at the Old Dardenne Presbyterian Church and was performed by Reverend Thomas Durfee, St. Charles County, Missouri.   At the time of their marriage Lewis, a farmer and tutor, was 33; Serena was 27. The fee was $5.00. Lewis and Serena had 6 children, 3 of whom probably died young.  With the exception of son James W., Lewis Howell, his wife and all their children are buried in the Old Dardenne Cemetery, Busch Wildlife Area, St. Charles County, Missouri.

Lewis received a classical education, and followed the profession of a teacher for many years.  Some of the best educated men and women of the State received instruction from him.  His life has been an eventful one, dating back to the very earliest period of the existence of our commonwealth, and as it cannot fail to be of interest to the reader, we here present the following autobiographical sketch, which he kindly prepared for this work, at the solicitation of the compilers:
"When eight or nine years of age I went to school to an Irishman for one and one half years. About one and one half years later I went to school to a gentleman by the name of Prospect K. Robbins from Mass. and when nearly twelve years old I went to the same gentleman for a few months and made considerable progress in arithmetic. The War of 1812 came on and I was nearly stopped from pursuing my studies. I studied as I had opportunity. After the war I was placed by my father in a school in the city of St. Louis, taught by a Mr. Tompkins, who afterwards became one of the Supreme Judges of the state. From this school I was placed in the care of Mr. U. J. Devore in St. Charles and remained there several months. English grammar was my principal study in both schools. I was now about 16 and when about 17, as my old teacher, U. J. Devore had been elected sheriff, he elected me for his deputy. I was accordingly sworn in and entered the work, young as I was. There were but two counties at his time North of the Missouri River, St. Charles and Howard - The former of which embraces now the counties of St. Charles, Warren, Montgomery, Lincoln, and Pike. There were not settlements any farther west at that time, until you came to the Booneslick road, embraced in Howard County. I had to ride over the five counties named, collect taxes, serving writs, etc. I continued in this business a few months. I worked in a store in St Charles a short time, then went back to labor on my father's farm, when my father having some business in Kentucky took me with him to that state.
"On our return to Missouri we overtook a family on the road moving to our state, by the name of Reynolds, originally of the city of Dublin, Ireland. He was so pleased with the description father gave him of this section that he determined to come to the neighborhood where we lived. With this gentleman who I believe was a profound linguist, I commenced the study of the Latin language. I can say without egotism, that I am very certain I was the first person that commenced the study of Latin between the two great rivers, the Missouri and Mississippi. I had to send to Philadelphia for the books which my teacher recommended. With him I read Ovid, Caesar, Virgil, Horace and a few others. Shortly after this Mr. Reynolds left the state and I went and spent a few months with my old teacher, General P. K. Robbins, where I studied a few mathematical branches, and this closed my literary studies at school. I gave up studying medicine, which I had long contemplated and came home. I was now 21 years of age and several of my neighbors and some relatives being anxious that I should teach school for them, I at last consented and accordingly taught a school and was well pleased with my avocation.
About this time there was considerable talk about the Province of Texas and the inducements held out to persons to migrate to the country. In consequence of this stir about James F. Austin's colony, a company of us agreed to pay it a visit; but all finally gave out going except my brother Frank and myself. We, alone, left Missouri January 22, 1822, for the Spanish province of Texas, which however we never reached. Having gone 50 or 60 miles south of the Red River, we decided it was imprudent to proceed further on account of the difficulties in the way, we retraced our steps and arrived home about the middle of March. When a few months over 22 I left home for the state of Louisiana. I took steamboat at St. Louis and landed in Iberville early in November. This place was 90 miles above New Orleans, where I remained until spring, being employed by a physician (a prominent man of the parish) to teach his and his neighbors' children, and to regulate his books, etc. He had an extensive practice. In the spring I went down to New Orleans and took passage on steamboat for Missouri. A year or two previous to this I went a session to a military school taught by an old Revolutionary officer. I took considerable interest in military tactics and was later appointed and commissioned Adjutant of the St. Charles Militia, my brother Frank being Colonel of the regiment. This office I held for several years, when I resigned, it being the only military office I ever held; and the only civil office I ever held was that of Deputy Sheriff. After this time I turned my attention to teaching and farming.
"I still continued teaching and keeping boarding school and had my farm also carried on, until the close of the Civil War, when I stopped farming as the servants I owned had been liberated. I rented my farm and moved to the little village of Mechanicsville, where I built and commenced a boarding school, being assisted by an eminent young lady, a graduate of one of the female seminaries of Missouri. This school was carried on five sessions. As my health failed I had to relinquish all public business. I am now in my 76 year; enjoy tolerably good heath for one of my age; can ride 35 or 40 miles a day. I am a member of the Presbyterian church to which I have belonged upward of 50 years. I attribute my health and advanced age to my temperate habits, having never yielded to dissipation of any kind."
  (A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri, with numerous sketches, anecdotes, adventures, etc., relating to Early Days in Missouri, by William S. Bryan and Robert Rose. St. Louis, Missouri: Bryan, Brand & Co., 1876.)

    ix. James Flaugherty Howell, born 5 February 1806; died 9 August 1836, at the age of 33.  Married Isabella Morris.
    x. Sarah Howell, born 4 July 1785 in Marion County, South Carolina; died 11 November 1846 in St. Charles County, Missouri. 

 

THIRD GENERATION

4.   Thomas Howell was born March 14, 1783 in Caswell County, North Carolina, and died September 12, 1869 in Howell's Prairie, St. Charles County, Missouri.  He married Susannah Callaway July 10, 1806 in St. Charles County, Missouri, the daughter of Flanders Callaway and Jemima Boone.  She was born January 4, 1791 in Boone's Station, Fayette County, Kentucky, and died December 23, 1876 in St. Charles County, Missouri.  Susannah Callaway was a sister of Captain James Callaway, in whose company Thomas served as a ranger.  Thomas died in his 85th year and was buried in the Thomas Howell Cemetery, St. Charles County, Missouri.  Susannah in her 87th and was also buried in the Thomas Howell Cemetery.

Children of Thomas Howell and Susannah Callaway:

    i. Coanza Burilla Howell, born 6 August 1807 in Howell's Prairie, St. Charles County, Missouri.  She married (1) John Milton McMillen on 29 August 1827 in St. Charles County, Missouri.  Seven children were born to them in St. Charles, Missouri: Amandalia McMillen, born 1833; John Madison McMillen, born 16 December 1829; Harriet McMillen, born 18 December 1832; James McMillen, born 1833; Pizarro McMillen, born 1836; Ellen McMillen, born 1840; Mary McMillen, born 1841.  Coanza married (2) William Blacketer, March 12, 1844 in St. Charles County, Missouri.  They had 4 children all born in St. Charles, Missouri: Ann Blacketer, born 1845; Raymond D. Blacketer, born 1847; William Blacketer, born 1846; Olive Blacketer, born 1850.
  5. ii.

Larkin Callaway Howell, born 20 September 1808 in Howell's Prairie, St. Charles County, Missouri; died 16 November 1865 in Summer Hill, Pike County, Illinois.

    iii. Eliza Ann Howell, born 11 February 1810 in Howell's Prairie, St. Charles County, Missouri; died 10 December 1893.  She is buried in the Thomas Howell Cemetery, St. Charles County, Missouri.
    iv. Pizarro W. Howell, born 28 November 1811 in Howell's Prairie, St. Charles County, Missouri; died 12 September 1881 in Howell's Prairie, St. Charles County, Missouri; buried Thomas Howell Cemetery, St. Charles County, Missouri.  He married 29 December 1836 in Howell's Prairie, St. Charles County, Missouri;
    v. Alonzo Boone Howell, born 21 September 1813 in Howell's Prairie, St. Charles County, Missouri; died 18 January 1902; buried in the Thomas Howell Cemetery, St. Charles County, Missouri.
    vi. James Callaway Howell, born 4 April 1815 in Howell's Prairie, St. Charles County, Missouri; died 30 June 1883; married 1 March 1853 in St. Charles County, Missouri.
    vii. Amazon C. Howell, born 19 January 1817 in Howell's Prairie, St. Charles County, Missouri; buried in the Thomas Howell Cemetery, St. Charles County, Missouri.
    viii. Eviza Lydia Howell, born 29 September 1818 in Howell's Prairie, St. Charles County, Missouri; died 24 May 1897 in Missouri; buried in the Thomas Howell Cemetery, St. Charles County, Missouri.  She married 17 June 1841 in St. Charles County, Missouri.
    ix. Mary Etaline Howell, born 19 September 1820 in Howell's Prairie, St. Charles County, Missouri.  Married 1st, 28 May 1846 in St. Charles County, Missouri; married 2nd, 16 November 1858 in St. Charles County, Missouri.
    x. Amandelia Howell, born 28 March 1823 in Howell's Prairie, St. Charles County, Missouri.  Married 28 December 1843 in St. Charles County, Missouri.
    xi. John Francis Howell, born 12 September 1825 in Howell's Prairie, St. Charles County, Missouri.
    xii. Jemima Elizabeth Howell, born 28 November 1828 in Howell's Prairie, St. Charles County, Missouri.  Married 8 November 1849 in St. Charles County, Missouri.
    xiii. Lewis Morgan Howell, born 19 August 1831 in Howell's Prairie, St. Charles County, Missouri.  Married 19 December 1860 in St. Charles County, Missouri.
    xiv. Sarah Minerva Howell, born 28 April 1834 in Howell's Prairie, St. Charles County, Missouri; died 23 December 1851 in Howell's Prairie, St. Charles County, Missouri; buried in the Thomas Howell Cemetery, St. Charles County, Missouri.

 

FOURTH GENERATION

5.  Larkin Callaway Howell was born 20 September 1808 in Howell's Prairie, St. Charles County, Missouri, and died 16 November 1865 in Summer Hill, Illinois (Pike County Cemetery Book).  He is listed as Larkin Flanders Howell or Larkin F. Howell on all legal documents.  Two court documents on file at the St. Charles Historical Society are:  William H. Salee vs. Larkin F. Howell (1854), and Larkin F. Howell vs. Memory Yarnell (1864).

Larkin married (1) Martha "Patsey" Baugh on 10 February 1831 in St. Charles County, Missouri.  She was born 1812 in St. Charles County, Missouri.  Larkin petitioned the court for a divorce from Martha in 1863 (St. Charles County Historical Society microfilm #106, file #4414).  Martha contested the divorce, stating that Larkin was spending too much time with his neighbors, Andrew and Martha Ann Harold.  After Mr. Harrold died, Martha stated, Larkin moved in with Mrs. Harrold.

He married (2) Martha Ann (Lemmons) Harrold on 31 July 1864 in Calhoun County, Illinois (Illinois marriage index).  In his will dated 15 November 1865, Larkin left everything to his "beloved wife, my second wife."  He left each of his children one dollarLarkin's will was probated 21 November 1865 in Pike County, Illinois.  Larkin is buried in the Summer Hill Sapp Cemetery, Summer Hill, Illinois.

Children of Larkin Howell and Martha Baugh:

    i. Susan Howell, born St. Charles County, Missouri.  She married F.W. Hinman June 5, 1848 in St. Charles County, Missouri.  In 1870 they were residents of Femme Osage Township, St. Charles County, Missouri.  Susan Howell Hinman is mentioned in the Petition for the Partition of the Thomas Howell Estate, Book 16, Pages 432-471, Recorders Office, St. Charles, Missouri March 3, 1874.  In 1900, Susan is living in St. Charles Township, St. Charles County, Missouri.  Susan and F.W. had five children:  Benjamin Hinman, born 1852; Eugene Hinman, born 1854; Louis Hinman, born 1861; Laura Hinman, born 1864; Adele Hinman, born 1868.
    ii. Lucinda H. Howell, born 5 April 1836 in St. Charles County, Missouri; died 15 February 1916 in Bowling Green, Pike County, Missouri; buried in Summer Hill, Illinois.  She married Wilson Steel.  In 1870 census, they show as residents of Boles Township, Franklin County, Missouri.  Lucinda Howell Steel is mentioned in the Petition for the Partition of the Thomas Howell Estate, Book 16, Pages 432-471, Recorders Office, St. Charles, Missouri March 3, 1874.  Lucinda shows in Pike County, Illinois during the enumeration of the 1880 census.  She is with her mother, Martha Howell, and her brother, James W. Howell.  In the 1910 census, Lucinda is listed in the Pike County, Missouri census with her daughter and granddaughters and with James W. Howell, her brother.
      Jemima Howell, born about 1839 in St. Charles County, Missouri.
    iii. Joseph T. Howell, born 1842 in St. Charles County, Missouri.  He is listed in the Petition for Partition of the Thomas Howell Estate, Book 16, Pages 432-471, Recorders Office, St. Charles, Missouri, March 3, 1874.
    iv. James W. Howell, born 1844 in St. Charles County, Missouri.  In 1870, James is living with his mother, Martha Howell, in Nevada Township, Vernon County, Missouri.  He is listed in the Petition for Partition of the Thomas Howell Estate, Book 16, Pages 432-471, Recorders Office, St. Charles, Missouri, March 3, 1874.  In 1880, James was living with his mother and his widowed sister, Lucinda Steel, in Martinsburg Township, Pike County, Illinois.  In 1900, he is living in Summer Hill, Pike County, with the orphaned children of his brother, John.  In 1910, James is with his sister, Lucinda Steel, living in Pike County.
  6. v. John Amazon Howell, born 1846 in St. Charles County, Missouri.
    vi. Marion McKinney Howell, born 1849 in St. Charles County, Missouri.  He married Sarah Washum Kingston on 1 January 1879 in Pike County, Illinois.  Marion was named in his parents' divorce papers as their youngest child.  In Some Boone Descendants by Lillian Hays Oliver, Marion is called Francis Marion McKinney Howell and is listed in the Petition for Partition of the Thomas Howell estate.  At the time of the 1870 census, he was living with Martha Howell and James W. Howell in Vernon County, Missouri.  In 1880, Marion is living with his wife and children in Pike County, Illinois.

 

FIFTH GENERATION

6.  John Amazon Howell was born 18 September 1848 in St. Charles County, Missouri, and died 2 February 1898 in Jackson County, Missouri.  In 1870, a still-single John was residing in Femme Osage Township, St. Charles County, Missouri with his sister and her husband, F.W. and Susan Hinman.  He married in St. Charles County, Missouri, Achsah Anna Van Valkenburg on 7 November 1875.  She was born 21 August 1852 in Nelsonville, Ohio.  John was a Constable in Kansas City, Missouri.  He is listed in the Petition for Partition of the Thomas Howell Estate, Book 16, Pages 432-471, Recorders Office, St. Charles, Missouri, March 3, 1874.   Anna died 25 February 1894 in Jackson County, Missouri.  John died in 1898.  Both are buried in Elmwood Cemetery, Kansas City, Missouri.  At his death, John left four orphaned children, the eldest being just 13. They went to live with their Uncle Jim Howell in Summer Hill, Illinois.

Children of John Amazon Howell and Ann Van Valkenburg:

    i. Lola Jane Howell, born 1 November 1884 in Jackson County, Missouri; died 15 December 1962 in Hannibal, Marion County, Missouri.  She married Isaac Martin Winn on 3 September 1905 in Bowling Green, Missouri.  In the 1900 census of Pike County, Illinois, Lola was living with Jabez and Fannie Fortune in Atlas Township.  She was listed as "servant."  Lola and Isaac has 14 children: Edith Marie Winn, born 1 October 1906, died 13 March 2001 in Hannibal, Marion County, Missouri, married _?_ See; Annie Beadie Winn, born 19 July 1908; John Edward Winn, born 20 March 1910; Ella Mae Winn, born 10 November 1911, died 6 November 2001 in Louisiana, Pike County, Missouri, married _?_ O'Keefe; Virginia Bell Winn, born 24 March 1913; Charlie Martin Winn, born 11 June 1915; Ada Ruth Winn, born 7 March 1917; Lola Maude Winn, born 29 June 1919; twins, Stella Leota Winn and Thomas William Winn, born 2 May 1921; Addie Pearl Winn, born 23 April 1922; James Perry Winn, born 21 November 1925, died 4 March 2001 in Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana; Mary Katherine Winn, born 25 June 1927, died 3 August 1987 in Bowling Green, Pike County, Missouri, married _?_ Price; Betty Jane Winn, born 22 October 1928, died 21 February 2000 in Jackson County, Missouri, married _?_ Singleton.
    ii. Martha Ella Howell.
    iii. Clifton Howell.
    iv. Thomas Howell.



Submitted by Didi Muir - 26Nov03

 

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